Pharmacy Foul-Ups & A Good Report on the PCH

Today I got a call from CA, the owner of the personal care home. She was having difficulty refilling DS’s prescription. He had only one tablet of Risperdal left for today and he is supposed to take two. (How did that happen? The last dose in the bottle should have been two tablets. Oh, well.)

CA’s problem was a pharmacy foul-up. The Rite-Aid pharmacy (formerly known as Eckerd’s) that is near my house tried to transfer his prescriptions, including a record of one refill being allowed, to a pharmacy near CA’s house in Douglasville. They mistakenly sent them to a pharmacy in Atlanta. The pharmacy near her house suggested she call the doctor for a refill. She tried to do that and only got a telephone answering system. (I know. You are required to listen carefully to the choices and press the right numbers to talk to the right person or voice mail box.)

I understood her frustration, and I offered to make some calls to try to straighten things out. First, I told her I would be leaving the doctor’s office out of it. It was the pharmacy’s fault, and this doctor’s office is an even greater pain to deal with,  in my opinion.

In the end I discovered that the pharmacy in Atlanta that had the prescriptions, an independent store named Pay Low,  was only twelve miles from where she lived, and they offered free delivery. I agreed. I was glad things were cleared up this time with very little trouble.

I have had my complaints before with Rite-Aid. They did not have Abilify in stock at all, when DS first needed it last summer. Typically when I try to refill the Risperdal, they do not keep a sufficient amount in stock, and they give me only a three-day supply, at first. Then I have to return for the other twenty-seven days worth. I asked them specifically with a “please” to stock it, but a pharmacy tech tried to explain that it was company policy to treat this drug this way. I suppose they have their reasons. I warned CA about this problem and advised her not to delay refilling prescriptions.

On a brighter note, I spoke with DS today. He seemed to be in a somewhat conversational mood. I filled him in on family plans for Christmas and assured him that we would be picking him up. I tried to catch him up on news of his brothers and sisters.

He filled me in on his doings. CA has been taking him shopping almost every day. “Christmas shopping?” I ask. Food shopping he says, and other kinds of shopping. Also, she has taken him to eat in restaurants quite a few times. (I forgot to ask who has been paying, but DS does have $97 a month to spare after paying for his PCH.) “How very nice,” I observe. He never got that kind of treatment at his other personal care home. He said he likes it in his new PCH much better. I am glad of that. This is a very unusual PCH because it is the home of the owner who is also the “staff” person.

It sounds to me like CA does not let DS stay at home alone much. She has taken him to church with her and on walks with the dogs. That is very wise on her part to keep him busy and to keep an eye on DS. It sounds like we are very blessed right now.

Explore posts in the same categories: Medications, People Who Help, Places to Live

Comment: