Archive for December 13th, 2007

Psychiatrists Assume Medication Noncompliance

Thursday, December 13th, 2007

memo book kept of mental illness

This post is another one of my Recollections posts where I am trying to catch up the story of my son’s schizoaffective disorder from summer 2007.

After my son, DS, got out of the hospital for the first time (June 2007) it became apparent pretty quickly that in many respects he was just as delusional as he was when he was in the hospital.

From my notes in my little red memo book (pictured), here is a sampling of what I was hearing from him all the time:

He suspects alcohol or drugs in the household water. He knows people who are not in his family are here in the house pulling pranks or putting alchohol in the water. He was washing his sheets everyday because someone is putting something in them, like drugs. He takes his sheets with him when we leave the house to go to therapy. He thinks someone shot a paintball at our window because there is a small speck of dirt there. One time when he took his medicine he said they dissolved instantly in his mouth, and he felt immediately worse. A gang is swapping his pills for poison. He left a note for the family that some cups are “dangerously laced – drink at risk to health and state of mind.” He said someone was playing pranks on him, contaminating the bathroom with some unnamed substance, as he cleaned some surfaces in the bathroom over and over, something he usually never did. (Too bad he never did a thorough job of it.) He announced that he was certain someone has been tampering with his income tax returns in his file drawer, although he had not looked at them yet.

That’s just a small sampling. I will write some more in some later posts.

I was very distressed, and on top of it all, he was often cranky with me and his five-year sister and two-year old brother. Sometimes I would call it downright verbally abusive.

I felt we needed help right away, and we could not wait for the intake appointment with Highland Rivers in Canton, Georgia, that was two weeks after his discharge. I thought I wanted to have DS’s follow-up care with them because the social worker at the hospital said they could offer therapy and possibly other help. We went there for an emergency appointment. When we got in a room with a therapist, after doing some preliminary paperwork, we were told their psychiatrists were too busy. It might take three days for one to get back to us. I did something I hate to do in front of strangers. I cried. The therapist suggested I needed a support group. That made me bristle. The real need here was help for my son.

I called the psychiatrist DS had before he went in the hospital, Dr. DB. He was more willing to help. He first assumed that DS might not be taking his medicine. Since I trusted DS to take his medicine, and he was always very good about taking it before, I did not take charge of it after he got out of the hospital… although I thought of it. This is a word to the wise. When there is a severely mentally ill person in the household, a non-mentally ill person should take charge of the medicine. Dr. DB wanted to wait a few days while we made sure DS was on his medication.